APPRECIATION = GOOD MORALE

Repost – March 17, 2015 (Crime & Mystery Blog)

I have been in the nations’ workforce since around the age of 14 or 15, when I started my work adventures as a plumber apprentice. I did this work for about four years, nearly every weekend during the school year and six days a week during the summer seasons. Doing this kind of work for so long has given me the knowledge and confidence in knowing that I can recognize good and lazy work. There is a lot I need to be refreshed on so I can be 100% back where I was when I did the job, but I can at least fix and repair simple, and some complex jobs, without the need of a professional all the time. During my four years as a plumber apprentice, I was appreciated nearly every day for my work since I worked for a private/sole proprietorship company. I was an employee that he needed and relied on to help get the jobs completed and done right. Working in the blistering sun during the summer times, like a slave working in the cotton fields, was probably the hardest and most grunt work I’ve ever done. I am subject to migraines, not so much now since I got older, but back during my teenage and young twenties migraines came almost two to three times a week during the summer time. Somehow I was able to work through it, sick as a dog later, and get the job done without sacrificing the work. In his own way, not always of monetary value, he showed his appreciation by either giving me a day off, paying for my lunch, giving me a raise, or showed his appreciation for the help in some way, shape or form.

I have worked plenty of jobs since then and learned how an employee should be appreciated and kept happy as best as possible. My worse job I ever did was being a cashier at a grocery store, which I did for a year, with spoiled ass customers and off the wall requests that would most of the time hold up my line, which of course frustrated customers. Even here doing this God awful job in dealing with the public, I was often appreciated for what I did such as not going on break due to a huge flow of customers, retrieving shopping carts, deshopping items and other things. Then I finally left a month before, after the Christmas Holiday, my ship out date to military boot camp in hot ass Alabama. When I joined the military in the late 1990’s, my first duty station was Panama in the summer of 1999. Appreciation was hard to come by, but it was definitely shown by my fellow soldiers and certain higher ranking members. Throughout my time in the military being appreciated seemed to be as scarce as it can be from the commissioned officers, and some non-commissioned officers, but I did my job anyway regardless. As long as my job was completed as it was supposed to and I did it right, I was happy and learned to not expect appreciative words or actions. I joined the civilian law enforcement career field in the early 2000’s and this is where I learned the term happy employees make good employees.

The job of a police officer is under appreciative as it is from the public, but you don’t expect the stress and under appreciation to come from your own ranks. Most police officers are more stressed out from within the ranks and from their employer, than from dealing with the public on a daily basis. This is where appreciation can go a long way in getting the most from your employees and watching them go above and beyond. I have worked for some employers that I didn’t mind going out of my way or above and beyond the call of duty because they would appreciate your efforts and will. Others would just look at you as if you had multiple heads or like you are just crazy for doing what you are doing. If you heard the statement or term “I would go to bat with him/her”, “I would go to war with this person”, or “I would go in the trenches for this person” is where the appreciation comes in. You have to understand and know your employees and what makes them tick and what makes them operate the way they do. I’m not saying you need to be with them 24/7, but as time goes on you should learn about your employees and how they work and their work ethic.

In certain area cultures in this country, appreciation is only given when you meet someone’s personal status of what they believe is a good and hardworking employee. If you don’t make a certain income level, know a certain person of a certain status, the same race, religion or ethnicity, or part of a certain clique you being appreciated is going to be hard to come by. I understand that appreciating an employee is shown in several different ways, but you have to let them know that you care about them and what they are doing. It goes vice versa too if an employee don’t appreciate the work and adjustment that the employer is doing to accommodate or work around them, then it won’t be returned to you. However, receiving appreciation sometimes can be overwhelming and unexpected as that has happened to me when I was a mail clerk in Tysons Corner, Virginia working for Aramark. I would always serve and deliver mail and packages for this company called BARENTS Group, who were the best type of people to work with and to conversate with. I still to this day miss most of the people there, and I am blessed to know that I have reconnected with some of them. I was given a cake for my birthday, invited to the conference rooms after their meetings to enjoy the rest of the food, bringing me Mardi Gras cake, and I mean all this was because they appreciated what I did for them. I felt so happy and so much appreciative that I went out of my way for them when I could and returned the favor.

I worked hard for them and was quickly putting their mail and packages as a priority to anyone else’s in the building. They did things for me that they didn’t have to do, but when they did it was honest and thoughtful. Today, I am experiencing another appreciation from my employer that I didn’t see coming at all, and that I truly appreciate them for doing so. I can’t speak about it right now, but with this show of appreciation towards me it let me know that they do care about my well-being, my morale and want to show me that I am wanted. This is something that they could have easily not done and just basically say to me good luck and we hope that things turn out for the better. With my previous job, that would’ve been the expected answer, but up here where I am not so close to the nation’s capital political theatre, things run differently and it appears that employees are appreciated better or more. You work hard and sacrifice your time and effort to make sure things are done as planned, they recognize that and actually appreciate you with meaning and purpose. In the near future I will share what that appreciation is, but just know that I am happy and morale has been boosted. When you are receiving blessings like this, and you are not used to it, it can feel odd and make you curious as if they have a mysterious agenda. Nope. Nothing of that has been noticed or seen. I will say this though, be appreciative for what you have, be thankful for what you have, continue to do your work as you are supposed to and everything God planned out will come to light, and it will be easier for you to see it and accept it.

Henry Scott

crimestation.wordpress.com (Original Blog Post)

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